COVID19 Impact with communities (Mini study) in Yommalath district, Khammoun province, Laos

COVID19 Impact with communities (Mini study) in Yommalath district, Khammoun province, Laos

I.   SURVEY FINDINGS  Economic impact

1.1.1.       Income

On the income aspect, the survey seeks to explore how the change of the income were made during the COVID impact which could be either positive or negative or there might be no changes income families because the change of the income is assumed that it depends on the people in the type of occupation, employment and how people are keen to adapt and generate better income opportunity etc.

The study shows that the income decreased less than 50% is high among the different group of population categorized by age. the income decreased less than 50 the group of age of 19-25 is high up to 9.47%, with the age of higher than 51 years old is 9.05%, 26-35 years old is 7.00% and 36-50 years old is 7.82% and 6.17% is children and youth. However, there is some percentage of income decreased greater than 50% in all groups of age which is concerning when we consider from the rapid changes of living cost during this time. In the group of children and youth under 19 years old and elders who are over 51 years old, many of t

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hem had no income changed, it is assumed to be because of most of them are not in the economic lead position. Within the group of economic leading like youth and middle-aged people there was minority of them had no income changes. There are very few of the middle-aged people and elders who were keen to adapt and took the opportunity to increase their income.  when we look deeper into by group of population, we found that the income of migrant workers was decreased less than and more than 50% which mean that most of them had no further incomes since they returned home and very few of them could earn but less than they usually earned.

COVID impact reportfirst draft

 

 

Telehealth service and COVID19 response by People Living with HIV/AIDS

Telehealth service and COVID19 response by People Living with HIV/AIDS

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  Lessons learned from monitoring and observation
Before started project activities we didn’t have enough information about mobiles phones,
smartphone and skill of using social media platform of peers, yes, all most of them have
smartphone but they are still low capacity on how to use the existing application apps inside a
smartphone and others online platforms
The online platform for telehealth services we used Google meet and zoom meeting, these
platform found a difficult for our peer educators because there have only English version, to
address those issues that our team called to each peer one by one for an explanation, how to used
Google meeting and zoom meeting platforms, while started the first meeting almost of them
abled to use meeting platforms but some time internet connection terrible, and some of
smartphone hard to use Google meet and then we changed Google meet into Zoom meeting and
its seems Zoom meeting application are more appropriated and convenience for them, however
all of them are still lack of skill of using online application forms, APPS and on line meeting
application.
Based on the observation and interview, the team found that peer had confidence to use telephone, WhatsApp and Messenger to discuss with PLHIV. However, because of new learning on
tele-health services, peer still was not familiar with it
2020 Global HIV Policy Report

2020 Global HIV Policy Report

Nearly forty years since the discovery and isolation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the science of HIV has never been better. Today, we have a better under-standing of how the virus functions and how to test, treat, and prevent HIV infection. We have clear evidence on the biomedical, social, and structural drivers of new HIV infec-tions and deaths, and new tools to halt them. Antiretroviral medicines (ARVs), for example, are available to save lives and to stop transmission—with new long-acting injectable forms shown just this month to be effective prevention for women.1 We have clear evidence that differentiating delivery of HIV service delivery to meet the needs of people works, that self-testing helps reach populations poorly served by other methods, that healthcare user fees push people out of HIV care, that criminalization of key popula-tions undermines access and drives HIV, and much more.

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World AIDS Day 2018

World AIDS Day 2018

14th December, Vientiane Capital |WHO, UNAIDS, the Association of People living with HIV (APL+), and the Centre for HIV/AIDS and STI (CHAS)  campaigned for HIV testing on the World AIDS Day 2018, which was commemorated on 1 December under the global theme “Live life positively—know your HIV status”.

Over 200 people, including people from key affected populations,  young people, and staff from the UN, the Ministry of Health, and CSOs, emphasized the importance of knowing your HIV status and practising safer sexual behaviours, by taking photos of themselves holding cards with messages, such as “Know your status, get tested”, “HIV prevention, starting from myself”, and “In Laos, we are fighting AIDS”. 

Staff from the UN are advocating HIV testing.

Over the past three weeks, many Facebook posts have been made by individuals, CSOs and governmental organizations. “If we all keep talking about these issues, and not just on World AIDS Day, we can remove any remaining  stigma about HIV, and people especially from the key-affected populations will be even more willing to get tested, “ said Dr Mark Jacobs, the WHO Representative to Lao PDR.

Globally 9.4 million people living with HIV still do not know they are living with a potentially deadly, but treatable, disease. In Laos, it is estimated that one-in-four people living with HIV do not know their status, when they are already ill and symptomatic. This leads to delay in starting treatment, undermining its benefits and increasing the risk of long-term complications.

In Asia and the Pacific, only one-in-three young people from key populations and about half of sex workers, men who have sex with men, people who inject drugs and transgender people are aware of their HIV status. Continuing stigma has created barriers for these populations to access HIV testing, prevention, treatment and care.

To help break the stigma , a “human library” was also  held at UN house on 14 December. Nearly 200 people joined the event. The “books” in the library were HIV experts and people living with HIV, who shared their own stories. Participants could then ask them questions about their personal experiences, building understanding.

People living with HIV and peer educators from hospitals are talking about HIV testing and treatmen

“This World AIDS Day, everyone can help combat HIV by sharing the message of ‘get tested’ with your friends and families and asking them to share with other people,” said Mr Thongdeng Silakoune, the Country Manager of UNAIDS, Lao PDR.

Mr Silakoune is giving a remark for the World AIDS Day.

30 years have passed since the first World AIDS Day in 1988.  The HIV response has made significant progress, with globally 75% of the people estimated to be living with HIV had accessed HIV testing and been diagnosed. Early diagnosis and one-pill-a-day treatment can suppress the HIV virus and allow the body’s immune function to recover.

“Today, people living with HIV can live much longer, and lead healthier lives. In fact, the life expectancy of people living with HIV who are on treatment is very close to that of people without HIV.” said Ms May Varissara, an international model campaigning for HIV test during the human library.

HIV testing services are an essential gateway to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support services. No matter the result, HIV test provides vital information. A negative result is an opportunity to take steps to stay HIV-free. A positive test result is a necessary first step towards accessing treatment and living a long and healthy life.

Knowledge is power. Knowledge gave individuals power over their environment and circumstances: the power to control their own destiny. The power for people to determine the right options to stay healthy. And the power to stay well and live long and productive lives.